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What is Mensa?

Mensa is an international society with one unique criterion for membership: a score in the top 2% of the population on a standardized intelligence test. It's a diverse community where members share a common trait—high IQ—and engage in stimulating intellectual and social activities. Ever wondered how joining Mensa could enrich your life? Discover the benefits and possibilities that await.
Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis

Mensa is a society for those who score high on intelligence quotient (IQ) tests. Invented in 1946, the group is the oldest society for high IQ-scorers in the world. Mensa operates on both international and local chapters and attempts to foster learning and programs for the gifted as well as conducting research and forming special interest groups to study pressing issues.

In 1946, the organization was founded by an Australian barrister named Roland Berrill and Dr. Lancelot Ware, a British layer and scientist. Their goal was to create a group based solely on testable intelligence; one that would have no social, racial or political requirements to join. It was meant to encourage social exchange between some of the smartest people on the planet, to create, in effect, a world-wide think tank of geniuses.

Those who qualify for Mensa must score at least a 98 percentile ranking on a standardized IQ test.
Those who qualify for Mensa must score at least a 98 percentile ranking on a standardized IQ test.

Admission to the organization is based on IQ test scores. Traditionally, membership is limited to those who score in the 98th percentile of specific tests, including the Stanford-Binet and Cattel versions. Currently, there are about 100,000 members across the globe, mostly in the United Kingdom and the United States. Membership is not limited by age, with children as young as toddlers admitted as members. The two youngest admitted members, Ben Woods and Georgia Brown, were both two years and nine months old.

Some evidence shows that toddlers who have been breastfed have higher IQ scores than their non-breastfed counterparts.
Some evidence shows that toddlers who have been breastfed have higher IQ scores than their non-breastfed counterparts.

The organization’s member benefits vary by nation, with some countries offering insurance and even credit card plans. Most national organizations put out a monthly or quarterly newsletter, and local chapters hold meetings to discuss general business and form special interest groups. These groups may vary widely in purpose, from brainstorming on local issues to creating support mechanisms for scholarship programs. While the group attempts to remain politically neutral, it supports educational efforts of every size.

Children as young as toddlers may be admitted to Mensa.
Children as young as toddlers may be admitted to Mensa.

Critics suggest that Mensa is overly exclusive, and that it puts a premium on standardized testing as the only true measurement of intelligence. In truth, most IQ tests rely on logic and reasoning ability, as opposed to emotional or artistic intelligence. The organization doesn’t claim that IQ tests are the only means of determining intelligence, just the easiest to quantify.

Naturally, Mensa has attracted a number of famous thinkers, some of whom have served as heads of the organization. Architect Buckminster Fuller and author Isaac Asimov served terms as president and vice-president of Mensa International. Other notable Mensans include Scott Adams, creator of the cartoon strip Dilbert, a former Playboy Playmate of the month, and noted actor James Woods.

Whether Mensa is overly dependent on measured intelligence or not, the dedication of the organization to improving educational programs and actively brainstorming complex social issues is doubtless a good idea. To apply for membership in the society, you must submit proof of a score in the 98th percentile of a standard IQ test, or take the Mensa-issued test. Their website provides a practice workout with detailed results, to give you an idea of where you stand in comparison to some of the best minds on earth.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Mensa and what is its primary purpose?

Mensa is an international high IQ society that aims to identify and foster human intelligence for the benefit of humanity. It provides a stimulating intellectual and social environment for its members. Mensa's primary purpose is to serve as a community for individuals who score in the top 2% of the population on standardized intelligence tests, encouraging research in psychology and intelligence, and promoting educational and charitable activities related to intelligence.

How can someone join Mensa?

To join Mensa, an individual must demonstrate their eligibility by scoring at or above the 98th percentile on a Mensa-approved intelligence test. This can be done by taking a supervised, standardized test with Mensa or by submitting prior evidence of qualifying scores from other accepted tests. Once the eligibility criteria are met, one can apply for membership through their national Mensa organization.

What types of activities and benefits does Mensa offer to its members?

Mensa offers a wide range of activities and benefits to its members, including local, regional, and international gatherings, special interest groups, and online communities. Members have access to exclusive publications like the Mensa Bulletin, opportunities for networking, and can participate in games, travel, and cultural exchanges. Mensa also provides scholarships and educational resources, fostering intellectual and social interaction among members.

Are there any special programs for children within Mensa?

Yes, Mensa has special programs for gifted children, such as the Mensa for Kids website, which provides resources and activities designed to engage and challenge young minds. Additionally, some national Mensa organizations offer programs specifically tailored for youth members, including educational events, competitions, and gatherings that allow young Mensans to connect with peers who share similar intellectual interests.

How does Mensa contribute to research and scholarship in the field of intelligence?

Mensa contributes to the field of intelligence research and scholarship through its Mensa Foundation, which promotes studies on intelligence and related fields. The foundation awards grants and scholarships to students, educators, and researchers. It also sponsors annual awards for research and creative achievements related to intelligence, thereby encouraging scholarly inquiry and academic excellence in the study of human intellect.

Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis

With a B.A. in theater from UCLA and a graduate degree in screenwriting from the American Film Institute, Jessica is passionate about drama and film. She has many other interests, and enjoys learning and writing about a wide range of topics in her role as a CulturalWorld writer.

Learn more...
Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis

With a B.A. in theater from UCLA and a graduate degree in screenwriting from the American Film Institute, Jessica is passionate about drama and film. She has many other interests, and enjoys learning and writing about a wide range of topics in her role as a CulturalWorld writer.

Learn more...

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glinda

An organization of people who have a genius IQ or higher.

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    • Those who qualify for Mensa must score at least a 98 percentile ranking on a standardized IQ test.
      By: Lisa F. Young
      Those who qualify for Mensa must score at least a 98 percentile ranking on a standardized IQ test.
    • Some evidence shows that toddlers who have been breastfed have higher IQ scores than their non-breastfed counterparts.
      By: Oksana Kuzmina
      Some evidence shows that toddlers who have been breastfed have higher IQ scores than their non-breastfed counterparts.
    • Children as young as toddlers may be admitted to Mensa.
      By: SergiyN
      Children as young as toddlers may be admitted to Mensa.